February – The Power

This highly rated, much raved about book was sure to hit our book club list at some point. I knew nothing about it, apart from the buzz (yeh sorry) about it being some great feminist instant modern classic. I had assumed that it was about Women finding their inner power, and ensuring that female persecution was a thing of the past. I expected a very deep, thought-provoking book, with some wonderful insight that would leave me with a book hangover for days, after all even Barack Obama listed it as one of the best books he read in 2017.

The Power – Naomi Alderman

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I thought it was a reasonably good concept, with the potential to address the issues of a patriarchal society with some element of wisdom. It was badly written, lacked the guts of a real storyline and basically teaches ‘yeh but if women held the balance of power, they’d be bastards too’. The only character that was developed properly was Tunde, and I felt that I understood him, and his motivation. Tunde’s character changed radically throughout the story, as and when things changed for him, in terms of his freedom and safety. I felt there was a huge hole in Allie’s story, as the situation with her foster Mum was never addressed when she dealt with her tormentor. I did get to the point where, if I read the work ‘skein’ again I was in danger of destroying the book, mostly I was just totally bored and couldn’t wait to finish it, but I did, so I’m proud of that.

I was really excited about reading this book, and then, urgh. Utter claptrap… I know that this is unlikely to be a popular opinion, but I really struggled to find a reason to keep going with this book. In the end, it was the fact that it was a book club book that made me plough through the dirge, that and the hope that there would be something (Come on the has to be SOMETHING) worth holding on for… for me, there was not! The book group seemed to agree on the fact that the story was confusing, even at the meeting some thought that the story was one thing, and some another. The ratings ranged from 1.5* (me) to 4.5* (Steph) and pretty much every rating in between, with nobody agreeing. I don’t know if this is a good thing, but it reminded me never to judge a book on behalf of somebody else.

The strange case of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde – Robert Louis Stevenson

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The strange case of Dr Jekll and Mr Hyde is so well known, and so often mentioned in everyday life, that I felt that I already knew the story. I have never read the book, and I did not even know that it was only a short story, but I loved it. The story is so beautifully written, that the 55 pages gave us plenty to discuss. In contrast to ‘The Power’, the characters in this short book were very well developed. Robert Louis Stevenson’s ability to engage his audience so quickly means that none of the prose is wasted, there is no need for long meandering descriptions. We get it, and we buy into it long before there is any reason to believe that Jekyll has something to hide.

I absolutely loved this story, I did not feel sympathy for Jekyll, but I did understand how a scientist would get so tied up in an idea, that they might cross a line, and descend into chaos. The moral dilemma; if you could, without recriminations do whatever your dark half wanted to do, would you? is a fascinating one, and I believe that many would. The end of the book shows the consequences of 1) letting go of your morals/ethics, and 2) messing with science, both of which could do with being taught more readily in my opinion. I gave the book 4.5*, as did Alex, and the others have all gone off to read it. A great wee, thought-provoking story, that can be read in an hour, what’s not to love?

Happy Reading!

Mel xx

 

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